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CDC: What Can Be Done to Prevent Youth Violence?

According to the CDC, each day there are 13 homicides in the 10 to 24 age group and an additional 1,700 youth treated in U.S. emergency departments for assault-related injuries, resulting in an estimated $17.5 billion in total costs per year.

According to the CDC, homicide, the third leading cause of death among young people 10 to 24, is responsible for more deaths in this group than the next six leading causes of death combined. Credit: Patch file
According to the CDC, homicide, the third leading cause of death among young people 10 to 24, is responsible for more deaths in this group than the next six leading causes of death combined. Credit: Patch file
From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Youth violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young person can be a victim, an offender, or a witness to the violence.

Youth violence includes various behaviors. Some violent acts—such as bullying, slapping, or hitting—can cause more emotional harm than physical harm. Others, such as robbery and assault (with or without weapons) can lead to serious injury or even death.

In this video session released last week from the Atlanta-based CDC, Grand Rounds explored the societal burden of youth violence, and the evidence-based approaches and partnerships that are necessary to prevent youth violence and its consequences. 

Homicide, the third leading cause of death among young people 10 to 24, is responsible for more deaths in this group than the next six leading causes of death combined. 

Each day, there are 13 homicides in this age group and an additional 1,700 youth treated in U.S. emergency departments for assault-related injuries, resulting in an estimated $17.5 billion in total costs per year. 

While many prevention programs have been found to significantly reduce youth violence, the available evidence-based approaches are often not used in communities because of real and perceived challenges to implementation. 

Some communities and public health departments have successfully built the capacity to take advantage of what we know works and are seeing substantial declines in youth violence.


Note: Portions of this text was edited for publication.

Ken Sucharski February 23, 2014 at 10:05 PM
And WHY is the CDC even involved? Sounds like a parental problem to me.
Octo Slash February 24, 2014 at 08:43 AM
Correct. Parental problem: They Don't Have Fathers.
Doc February 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM
When have we as a nation not been using VIOLENCE/WARS to settle conflicts over the last 50 years? American children have been raised to go and fight wars using guns to settle America's issues with its world neighbors. But when those same youth use that violence here at home, everyone gets upset and is worried that the violence may touch them. Teach your children that WAR and its VIOLENCE is NOT the way to solve issues and problems with others! CDC is involved because its a PUBLIC HEALTH issue!!!!
Harry Ball February 24, 2014 at 11:28 AM
According to the US Department of Justice, Blacks, 12.5-13% of the population (1), were responsible for 52.5% of all homicides in America from 1980-2008. Page 12 table 7 at http://bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf (1)Black population obtained from the US Census
David Brown February 24, 2014 at 12:53 PM
Harry, what point were you attempting to make with your comment?

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